Launching an Agile Pilot


rajile

So you want to launch an Agile Pilot?

Taking the first steps are often the toughest. An Agile implementation is not proven in your own organization and it is difficult to know if the benefits can be real and lasting.

The following are some suggestions to consider when embarking on a pilot. They are taken from various sources including Mike Cohn, Jeff Sutherland, informal chats with Agile practitioners, personal experience and various books on the topic of Agile and organizational transformation.

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You have a great idea? How to get executive buy-in.


One reason bottom-up proposals fail is because idea champions don’t engage their executives in the right way. Whether you are promoting new methods, practices, tools, or cultural changes, getting your exec team on board can make all the difference.

Having influenced executives for many years, I’ve made my share of mistakes and had some successes. Here are a few things I learned along the way.
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Why would I want to know more about Agile & Outsourcing? – Poll


Catherine Louis and I are collaborating on research about outsourcing. Below is a list of questions about outsourcing. We’re looking for some feedback. Can you help us sort this list of questions in order of importance? If there is a reason for outsourcing or not outsourcing that is not included in the list, please add it as one of your choices.
Which of the following reasons are the most important ones for outsourcing–and which ones would you want to learn more about?

You can select your 3 top choices from the list, or add one of your own and click on the vote button!

Thanks.

What’s the one lever that can transform your business?


The Power Of Habit

The Power Of Habit (Photo credit: Earthworm)

I recently read (and read again) a book by Charles Duhigg that got me thinking about the power of a single idea that can transform an entire business. The book is called The Power of Habit.

Here is a summary of one story in the book that made clear to me, the opportunity to lead powerful change.

On a blustery October day in 1987, a herd of prominent Wall Street investors and stock analysts gathered in the ballroom of a posh Manhattan hotel. They were there to meet the new CEO of the Aluminum Company of America–Alcoa. It was a company that for nearly a century had made foil wraps for Hershey kisses,  the metal in Coca-Cola cans and the bolts that hold satellites together. Many in the audience had invested millions in this company. But in the past year, investors had started grumbling. Alcoa’s management had made misstep after misstep trying to expand their markets and customer while competitors stole them away.

There was relief when the board announced a new CEO, but that relief, at least today, was about to be turned on its head. Appointed to the post of CEO was a former government bureaucrat named Paul O’Neill. A few minutes before noon, O’Neill took the stage. He was 51 years old, trim, and dressed in grey pinstripes and a red power tie. His hair was white and his posture military straight. He looked dignified, solid, confident. Like a chief executive. Then he opened his mouth…

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Whole-Team Dynamic Organizational Modeling a Success at Agile2012


Yesterday, Catherine Louis and I delivered our three-hour workshop on “Whole-Team Dynamic Organizational Modeling” at the opening of the conference. It was well-attended–standing room only. Our colleague, Neil Johnson wrote about in his AgileSOC blog here. InfoQ wrote an article about it here. Thanks to Shane Hastie of InfoQ for attending and sharing our work with everyone.